top of page

juliepaynemft Group

Public·176 members
Danny Garceau
Danny Garceau

Code: Debugging The Gender Gap


The state of the art in lossless data compression at the time was Huffman coding. This approach starts by finding sequences of bits in a data file and then sorting them by the frequency with which they appear. Then the encoder builds a dictionary in which the most common sequences are represented by the smallest number of bits. This is the same idea behind Morse code: The most frequent letter in the English language, e, is represented by a single dot, while rarer letters have more complex combinations of dots and dashes.




Code: Debugging the Gender Gap


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furlca.com%2F2tLMvb&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw0VBsscQEN52BmoYk_tNBIp



On March 7, 2016 Professor Nathan Ensmenger will be hosting a screening of the film CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap at the IU Cinema. The CODE documentary exposes the dearth of American female and minority software engineers and explores the reasons for this gender gap. CODE raises the question: what would society gain from having more women and minorities code?


CODE documentary exposes the dearth of American female and minority software engineers and explores the reasons for this gender gap. CODE raises the question: what would society gain from having more women and minorities code?


Unbeknownst to many, computer coding was invented by a woman. In 1944, Admiral Grace Hopper of the U.S. Navy was working on the Harvard Mark 1 when she developed a computer-independent programmable language, a language used to this day with every computer big and small. Hopper was not a gender anomaly, early on, women were seen as ideal programmers because their hands were small enough to work inside the equipment and they could handle the laborious, and somewhat unglamorous process of coding. Yet, seventy years later, women make up a fraction of the computer programming and science world, a world that is exploding and only growing bigger by the day. Why?


Harry WolffIt's those Sunday evenings just sipping whiskey and disappearing out to space. Yeah. So when you're making your own static site generator, like the, you have to understand the core principles of what it is like you're taking markdown through a template system, engendering HTML. And there's configuration like that's, that's basically what you're doing, and pass that it's input transformed output. So you could literally write one file, it just takes in a globs for all the files in your file system and just directly outputs them. And then from there, you can add complexity, which is always fun. But it's like, you know, given this context, like if it's a dot css file and add this different transform, do you want to augment how your markdown engine behaves, like allow for configuration there? And, and there's so many ways, and half the struggles that I have with Rob tar is not necessarily in the implementation, it's in the design and architecting of how you'll use it. Yeah, the usability, the ergonomics, just understanding like how I'm making it for myself, but also to be accessible to anyone to make it as enjoyable as unpleasant to use as possible. So what API can I provide that if what I have done out of the box does not work for you? How can you augment it to fit your needs, and to do it in a way that you're not cursing my Name, which I always love to hear curses about my name, fucking hair? That guy


From 1:00pm to 3:07pm today, we watched a documentary called Code: Debugging the Gender Gap. This film talked about the lack of women in programming, why this is the case, and what can be done to deal with this. From this film, I learned how large the gender gap in coding is. In the past I was aware of this, but always thought it was a minor issue, not one of the scale presented. When viewing this, I felt disappointed that our society was unable to fix this issue. This is not an issue based in lack of talent or skills, it is a problem with attitude and opportunities, which seems like it should be easy to deal with. I think that simply encouraging people to go into STEM, and having programs specifically for under-represented groups will help improve diversity in STEM. After doing this, it is necessary for employers to be thinking of women and minorities when building the workplace environment, which will improve inclusion.


Robin Hauser Reynolds talks about "CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap," a documentary which exposes the dearth of American female and minority software engineers and explores the reasons for this gender gap. 076b4e4f54


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page